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We had our first snow of the season on Saturday—a fluffy powder that transformed trees to Battenberg lace. The flakes were too tiny to reveal intricacies as they speckled my brown coat on my walk to and from our synagogue for Shabbat services. By evening, at least four inches covered Al’s car in our drive, and our once-plowed street was white again.

But, no matter. It was our 33rd wedding anniversary, and we would not be deterred from dinner at our favorite restaurant. Snow powdered the night sky as Al carefully drove us along semi-cleared streets. A few other intrepid New Englanders were out and about, as well, and the restaurant was packed when we arrived. We watched the snow blowing beyond the windows as we toasted another year together, a challenging year dominated by my deteriorating hands, but a year that brought us closer.

By the next morning, the sun was high and snow dripped from trees and eaves. We enjoyed a great brunch out, then drove into Boston for a powerful performance of Hold These Truths, a play by Jeanne Sakata, at the Lyric Stage Company. It’s based on the true story of Gordon Hirabayashi, who challenged the internment of fellow Japanese American citizens during World War II. Inspiring and sobering, well worth seeing, especially now.

I was still thinking about the play on Monday as I set out to the hospital at seven o’clock for my HBO therapy. By the time I left, nearly half-past eleven, the temperature was mild, much like that day so long ago when Al and I married.

It was my second marriage, his first. I had sewn my wedding gown, hand stitching nine yards of lace to the tulle veil. The rabbi who introduced us performed the ceremony. We were giddy and full of optimism as we drove to Cape Cod for our honeymoon. One misty night, as we walked Nauset Beach, the sand sparkled with each footstep and the sea froth glowed. It was ghostly, mystical. It gave me chills.

Later, we learned that we had witnessed the natural phenomenon of sea phosphorescence, caused by tiny sea creatures, or, perhaps, some form of sea algae, with their own inner light. But I still think back on that night, when we had no answers and only astonishment, as filled with an eerie, magnificent magic.

About a month later, we learned that I had some form of autoimmune disease. Three years beyond that, I was diagnosed with scleroderma.

I have written before in these posts how a complex, chronic disease becomes the third—unwanted but ultimately accepted—partner in a marriage. Sometimes it fades to the background and can almost be forgotten. Other times, it clears its throat with a rough cough, demanding attention. Then there are times, like this year, when it roars and dominates.

Thirty-three years is a long time to live with an unwelcome guest. Throughout, Al has been by my side, steadfast, the one who hears and sees the worst of it and always reminds me that as long as we have each other, we’ll be okay. The excitement I felt on our wedding day may have all too soon been supplanted by the fear and anguish of a terrifying diagnosis. But love and trust, tended over decades, have proven much stronger than any disease.

Outside our window on Monday night, the streetlamp casts a stark, inky shadow on the snow from the sign Al placed on our front yard a few weeks ago: “Hate Has No Home Here.” He has given more signs to our neighbors, who were pleased to accept them. A few have placed the signs already; he hopes to create a little oasis of radiance on our street. Wednesday evening, at his initiative, we will help serve meals at a homeless shelter nearby.

This is the man who left a trail of sparkles in the sand on a misty night, as a ghostly surf pounded the shore. I had no idea, then, how truly lucky I was.

Evelyn Herwitz blogs weekly about living fully with chronic disease, the inside of baseballs, turtles and frogs, J.S. Bach, the meaning of life and whatever else she happens to be thinking about at livingwithscleroderma.com.

Image Credit: Luke Hodde

Comments

  1. I started reading your blog to understand more of what was happening to my mother. My mother died last fall but I find myself still reading your blog. Some months I wonder why I bother, your blog is great but my mom is gone and nothing I read here can help her anymore. But then some months I read it and I’m overwhelmed with the tender piercing beauty of people and the world and whoa. Anyway, thank you. I’ve been wanting to thank you again and again and again but always felt silly.
    Thank you.

    • I’m so sorry for your loss, Valerie. I hope that my words have been able to give you some comfort, at least. It means a lot to me that you’ve kept reading. I don’t often know who’s out there, and a comment like yours makes it all worthwhile. Be well.

  2. Andrea Clark says:

    Very sweet tribute to Al, and to your marriage! Happy anniversary!

  3. Patricia Bizzell says:

    Such a beautiful tribute, Evie. I admire the courage of both of you!

  4. Karen Lurie says:

    How lucky you and Alan have been to have found each other, loved each other; and been the rock and strength for one another. And how lucky your girls are to have been brought up in that atmosphere. I hope your treatments are working for you.

  5. Happy Anniversary, Evelyn & Al.
    Your collection of writings is always very informative and extremely insightful.
    White a nice tribute to Al…He is your Knight in Shining Armor.

    Warm regards, Lynn Horn

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