Im-patient

One week and counting since my hand surgery. On Tuesday afternoon, we will meet again with Dr. S to review status and plan next steps. Contrary to my initial euphoric reaction to seeing that I still had 10 fingers when I woke up from the operation last Monday, I soon realized, when changing my dressings, that the situation was much more complicated.

I have temporary pins in the two fingers I thought I was going to lose, not permanent ones. I’m hoping that Dr. S has received helpful, wise feedback from the other hand surgeons on his listserv, but I am not optimistic that he will be able to save those two fingers. Like I said, it’s complicated. At the very least, he bought me time for a thorough review.

In short, he did exactly what he said he would. He stabilized my hands for the next phase. It’s a real relief to have the protruding tips of bone removed and the two broken fingers no longer flopping when I bandage them. I have six open wounds to dress every day. It takes about two hours and is very tiring, sometimes quite painful. Al is a great help, as always. I have certainly shed plenty of tears as I have tried to come to terms with everything. And he has given me plenty of good hugs.

It’s been an emotionally and physically draining week, especially when I realized the pins were temporary. Thank goodness for family and friends who have been a tremendous support, with meals, visits and phone calls that have given me a big boost.

But I wish it were over already. I wish that I could visit the original Star Ship Enterprise, go to Sick Bay and have Dr. McCoy wave that magical tricorder over my hands to heal them immediately. He was my favorite character. If wishes were fishes . . .

In addition to seeing Dr. S on Tuesday, I have an evaluation on Thursday at the Wound Center for hyperbaric chamber treatment that may accelerate the healing process. Dr. S had also mentioned the possibility of giving me Botox shots in my hands to block the sympathetic nervous system response that causes my blood vessels to contract so quickly and uncomfortably from Reynaud’s. Apparently, the shots would last three months and carry me well into the winter with warmer hands, another boost for healing.

So that is what I must focus on. I have stopped watching the evening TV news and only read or listen to thoughtful podcasts to keep up with current events. I figured out how to prop up a book and use a stylus to help me turn pages—a major achievement and relief to begin reading again. I am building up my stamina to sit at the computer for a couple of hours a day, so I hope to be able to get some client work done this week. I have cut back on the Vicodin to one pill at night. It causes crazy dreams, sometimes very scary, so I hope to be free of that soon. Each day brings small victories that deserve celebration and gratitude. No Dr. McCoy, just the hard reality of slow and (I hope) steady healing.

Evelyn Herwitz blogs weekly about living fully with chronic disease, the inside of baseballs, turtles and frogs, J.S. Bach, the meaning of life and whatever else she happens to be thinking about at livingwithscleroderma.com.

Image Credit: DeForest Kelley as Dr. McCoy from the original Star Trek, Wikimedia Commons

Comments

  1. Evelyn Driscoll says:

    Thank you for chronicling your struggles. I am on a similar journey and literally feel your pain. I wish you much strength, courage and luck.

  2. Paticia Bizzell says:

    Dear Evie, I so admire your courage, and especially your ability to see a lighter side. I smiled when I saw the photo of Dr. McCoy and I guessed what you would say about him.

    Thank you for keeping us up to date on the treatment plan. You know I am in your corner all the way. And it appears from the Evelyn Driscoll post that you are helping others as well.

  3. Mihoko Wakabayashi says:

    Dear Evelyn,

    I shared your update situation with Sally and other people in the Wed. evening class. I am sending my loving and healing energy on your way. I hope you keep courage, faith and hope in this difficult time.

    With much love,
    Mihoko

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