Waiting for Skylar

Once again, for the third time in two weeks, we await a major Nor’easter here in New England. This one’s name is Skylar, and it promises to dump at least 8 more inches on Central Massachusetts today, more on Boston. In the meantime, at least half of the 16-plus inches we got last Wednesday has melted. And by the weekend, it’s supposed to hit the 50s, thank goodness!

In preparation, I ran around for a couple of hours on Monday to complete errands before the storm. And did a lot of waiting. First, I had to wait a half hour to see my ENT, a follow-up visit after he had removed my ear tubes last month, post HBO therapy, to be sure everything had healed. Indeed, my eardrums are back to normal, which he confirmed in a five minute check-up. We commiserated about the approaching weather (his home had just regained power from the last storm) and I went on my way.

Next stop was Home Depot for a quick errand. I had to wander around to find someone who could direct me to the right aisle, but at least I had picked the proper section of the superstore and was able to get out of there in about 15 minutes.

Then I headed to the bank to make a deposit. Plenty of cars in the parking lot and another wait in line, as everyone else seemed to be on a mission ahead of bad weather. (Yes, I’m one of those people who do not trust taking a picture of my check on my smartphone and sending it electronically to the bank—not interested in expanding my digital footprint in that way.) The teller and I wished each other a safe day on Tuesday.

On to CVS to pick up some prescriptions. The clerk had trouble finding the second order, finally located it, then noted that our insurance hadn’t covered it. This required some follow-up (we’ve had a recent change in our insurance) and everything was straightened out, after more waiting. And waiting for the updated receipt to be checked into their system. All of this took about a half hour.

Finally, my last stop: blood work at the clinic near our home. I have to have a liver function test done monthly for one of my medications. I’ve been on this drug for many years and never (thank goodness) had a negative test. It seems like a huge waste of time and money. Even my rheumatologist thinks it’s ridiculous. But it’s required. Fortunately, I got right in. The phlebotomist wondered aloud if they would have to come in during the storm. “You’d be amazed how upset people get if their doctor’s appointment is cancelled,” she said, “even if it’s not safe to drive.”

Over the course of my two hours of running around, the sky changed from blue with bright sunshine amidst puffy white clouds to silvery gray. You can feel it in the air that snow is coming. Mother Nature has a way of forcing us to hurry up in order to slow down. Just enough time to take care of my to-dos before Skylar’s arrival. Then I’ll hunker down and simply watch the flakes fall.

Evelyn Herwitz blogs weekly about living fully with chronic disease, the inside of baseballs, turtles and frogs, J.S. Bach, the meaning of life and whatever else she happens to be thinking about at livingwithscleroderma.com.

Arts and Flowers

We’re having a brief respite from the cold before bitter weather arrives once again. So what better time to get a mental and spiritual break from winter than this past weekend at the Worcester Art Museum’s annual Flora in Winter exhibit. Local florists and garden club mavens create beautiful floral interpretations of art in nearly every gallery. Here are ten of my favorites. Enjoy!

Evelyn Herwitz blogs weekly about living fully with chronic disease, the inside of baseballs, turtles and frogs, J.S. Bach, the meaning of life and whatever else she happens to be thinking about at livingwithscleroderma.com.

Special Treat

I am getting really tired of winter. I know, it’s only a month into the season, officially. We’ve had one real storm and another day of snowfall; not so bad, so far. But it’s the extreme cold of recent weeks and the fluctuating temperatures that I’m finding exhausting. At least the days are getting noticeably longer, once again—a saving grace.

So it was this weekend that I decided to beat the winter blahs and treat myself to some new clothes. I have been wearing the same sweatpants, turtle necks and long sweaters, in varying combinations, for months, now. And I have not gone clothes shopping in a very long time—not since my hands began to deteriorate last spring. The idea of trying on outfits was anathema. I couldn’t manage it. Now that my hands have healed, a shopping spree was a real option.

It didn’t hurt that end-of-season sales were in full swing (ironic, since the season is far from over!). I gave myself a full afternoon, so I wouldn’t feel rushed, to check out some stores at a nearby mall. This, in itself, was a change of tempo, since I’ve come to rely on the Internet for the majority of my purchases.

I picked a good time, because the mall was not crowded. The stores I chose had only a few customers; sales staff were pleasant and helpful. And I scored big: a pretty and practical wardrobe for transitional temperatures, with coordinated layers that I can mix and match. All soft, comfy and relatively easy to put on and take off. And all within the modest budget I’d set for myself.

Most amazing, I actually had fun shopping! This has not been the case for a long time. Dressing, undressing and dressing again has been a huge hurdle. I haven’t been happy with how clothes fit. But I’d done enough homework to pick the right stores with options that fit my taste and pocketbook. In two hours, I was done, buoyed by success.

In addition, I realized that my vision, which has been blurred for weeks due to the hyperbaric oxygen therapy, is beginning to clear. When I had ventured to a mall several weeks ago for a small errand, the signs were so blurred that I felt dizzy. As I left the mall on Sunday, it suddenly occurred to me that I hadn’t noticed or felt disoriented by my inability to see objects that were farther away. So, more progress.

Snow on the ground will be gone by Tuesday evening, thanks to a day of heavy rainfall (fortunately we’re in a short warming pattern, or we’d be buried again). At some point, the crocuses will peak out of our garden. And I continue, thank goodness, to heal.

Evelyn Herwitz blogs weekly about living fully with chronic disease, the inside of baseballs, turtles and frogs, J.S. Bach, the meaning of life and whatever else she happens to be thinking about at livingwithscleroderma.com.

New Year, New Hands

Last Thursday, I finished my 40th dive in the hyperbaric oxygen chamber. My grafts have healed. The Wound Center staff gave me a “certificate of completion” decorated with pictures—a fountain pen and typewritten words, a graphic for all the podcasts I listened to while bandaging up my fingers after my dives, an image of a Fig Newton, my favorite post-dive snack. Everyone signed with good wishes. I promised to come back and visit.

It seems amazing to be through. I still have bandages on my thumbs—the right as it continues to heal and the left, to protect a chronic pit that waxes and wanes. I’m moisturizing the grafts during the day, leaving them exposed to the air so the skin toughens up but remains pliable. I’m learning to interpret the sensations from the flap on my right middle finger. And I’m touch-typing away, thank goodness.

Christmas weekend, I took my daughters to see my sister and her family in the Midwest, my first trip since Al and I traveled to Norway in August. A good visit, anticipated for months, certainly not as strenuous a journey as this summer, but a bit of a psychological hurdle, given how my hands fell apart when we were abroad. I took extra care to protect my fingers, which paid off. No new ulcers, no damage. Just a rotten head cold on the way home, which mostly cleared by the end of the week.

So, here I am, starting 2018 with “revised” hands, all ten fingers. There is adjusting to do. I need to relearn what I can and cannot tackle, given that left index and right pinky are fused at the joint, right middle is stubby like a cigar, and left middle no longer bends at the partially amputated, grafted tip. The grafts have no nerve sensitivity, which requires mindful awareness of what I place where. Most of my fingers no longer move the way they used to. I’ve made an appointment for Thursday to see an occupational therapist in my hand surgeon’s office, to get some exercises to strengthen my grip, increase flexibility and discuss what I need to adapt.

Still, I’m feeling upbeat. I can do for myself again. Even temperatures here in the deep freeze for another week are only a temporary annoyance. Tucking hot packs into my wrist warmers staves off numbness. Staying cozy beneath the covers for an extra hour in the morning, now that I don’t need to push to get to the hospital, helps, too.

I could never have imagined, on New Year’s last, that I would be celebrating having all my fingers today. It’s just as well that we can’t see into the future. Too terrifying. If 2017 has taught me anything, it’s been how to stay very focused on the present, to measure progress in small steps, to be grateful for little victories that add up with persistence, to not let my fears keep me from taking reasonable risks for my health.

So, here’s to 2018. Bring it on. Just let me keep my fingers, please.

Evelyn Herwitz blogs weekly about living fully with chronic disease, the inside of baseballs, turtles and frogs, J.S. Bach, the meaning of life and whatever else she happens to be thinking about at livingwithscleroderma.com.


As of today, I have five dives left. My progress has been striking. I am touch-typing this post with five fingers between my two hands. Grafts on my right pinky and left middle finger have fully healed, as has the flap on my right middle finger. My left index graft is close to healed, though it’s taking longer because of a probable infection that is now under control. My right thumb is closing up, even as a second ulcer with calcium deposits opened in the tip last week.

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy notwithstanding, calcinosis remains one of my biggest challenges. My fingers are loaded with the little gray pits, and one is rising to the surface of my right index finger at just the wrong pressure point. But there is no cure for this, only patience and constant tending. Meanwhile, the worst of this marathon is behind me, thank goodness.

A friend asked me what I would do with all the time freed up in the morning, after the HBO ends next Thursday. Well, for one thing, I hope to get a little more sleep! It will be a pleasure not to have to head out to the hospital on a cold wintry morning at 7 o’clock. My goal is to use the regained three hours for my fiction writing. I’ve had to put this aside for the duration—filling the gap by listening to fine fiction via audio books while lying in the HBO chamber. Good to get back to my own creative writing, especially now that I can type again.

It will take some time to fully adjust to my “revised” hands. I’m still figuring out how much pressure I can exert on the two fingers that now have fused bones where knuckles used to be. I have next to no feeling in the grafts, so I have to learn how to interpret sensations deeper in these fingers—and avoid damaging what I don’t immediately notice.

The finger with the flap presents its own unique challenge: since the skin that was once the side of the finger is now wrapped over the top of the amputated tip, the nerves send confusing signals to my brain. The finger is also notably shorter and stubbier, which requires some readjustment to reach. I’m not quite sure what/where I’m feeling. So, practice, practice, practice, and my brain, I trust, will rewire.

But I remain amazed to have come through this eight month ordeal with functioning hands and ten fingers. This evening is the eighth night of Hanukkah. For me and my family, it is a most fitting way to mark my miraculous recovery.

I will be traveling over the weekend and taking a break next week from blogging. To you, Dear Reader, best wishes for a wonderful holiday season filled with joy, love, health and healing.

Evelyn Herwitz blogs weekly about living fully with chronic disease, the inside of baseballs, turtles and frogs, J.S. Bach, the meaning of life and whatever else she happens to be thinking about at livingwithscleroderma.com.

Image Credit: Element5 Digital

Baking Bread

As of today, I am two-thirds of the way through my HBO treatments: 20 dives down, 10 to go. Last week’s mishegas about another potential infection was doused effectively with medical grade bleach soaks for the recalcitrant graft and a visit to Dr. S, who reassured me that the finger looked fine. Thank goodness!

Meanwhile, I continue to make more progress. Each day, the edges of the grafts pull a little farther away from surrounding skin, which is what they are supposed to do as new skin forms beneath. My fingers feel more able, despite missing tips and odd shapes.

I didn’t cook Thanksgiving dinner (Al’s department—and very good it was, too), but I did make the stuffing that we baked separately in the oven (main course was pecan-crusted salmon). This is one of the first times in about six months that I could tolerate stirring contents of a hot pan. Previously, the rising heat and steam were very painful to my exposed, over-sensitive wounds. Not to mention, I couldn’t hold the spoon.

My biggest accomplishment in the kitchen, however, was finally being able to bake bread again. It has been my practice for years to bake fresh challah for our Friday night Shabbat meal. I have a great recipe from a cookbook that my sister gave me nearly 30 years ago, and I’ve been making it since Mindi was a toddler who relished punching down the risen dough each week.

It’s the highlight of our Shabbat dinner, as well as a source of pleasure and pride for me to provide my family and friends with delicious homemade bread. But my hand debacle has made this favorite, meditative task an impossibility since summer. Al took over baking after my surgery and has become quite adept. Still, I missed doing it myself.

So this post-Thanksgiving Friday, as I was hanging out in the kitchen with my two visiting daughters, I decided to see if I could once again slip my fingers into a pair of de rigueudisposable rubber gloves, essential for any handling of raw ingredients—and, voila, to my amazement, they fit over my bandages without any discomfort! I proceeded to proof the yeast, pour flour, sugar, salt, oil and eggs, plus the yeast and warm water, into our old Cuisinart, mix the dough and pull it out onto the floured bread board.

And, as my daughters gave approval and encouragement, I kneaded the dough by hand. This is my favorite part of baking bread. There is something so magical and satisfying about feeling the dough transform from a sticky mass to a smooth, soft, elastic whole. My hands had not lost too much strength or touch. Into the oiled bowl the dough went, covered with a clean towel, to rise.

I punched it down for the first rising, but Mindi was getting organized to drive back to Boston by the time the dough had doubled in size a second time. “Do you want to punch it down?” I asked. “It was a little hard for me because my fingers don’t bend quite right.” She smiled, then proceeded to expertly punch all the air out of the dough. Still a special moment to share.

Later, when the challah came out of the oven, I sent her a text with a photo.

“Ta-da!” I wrote.

“Very nice!” she responded.

Yes, very nice, indeed.

P.S. This post is my 300th entry in this blog, When I began writing in January 2012, I had no idea where what has become an online journal of my life with scleroderma—and just life, which is really the point—would take me. More than 200,000 words later, I’m still discovering. Thank you, Dear Reader, for sharing the journey, and for your encouraging and thoughtful comments along the way, which keep me going.

Evelyn Herwitz blogs weekly about living fully with chronic disease, the inside of baseballs, turtles and frogs, J.S. Bach, the meaning of life and whatever else she happens to be thinking about at livingwithscleroderma.com.

Maiden Voyage

Hallelujah! I can drive again long distance on my own. Last weekend’s hour-plus experiment with Al as my backup gave me the confidence to try going it alone this week. So on Friday, after finishing up my morning HBO therapy, doing all of my bandages and putting on my makeup (not allowed inside the chamber), I drove an hour into Boston to see my favorite hairstylist for a good cut.

Now, to some it may seem silly to drive that far just to get a haircut. However, this stylist has been doing my hair for more than 15 years, beginning when I was commuting to work near Boston. She is very gifted, precise and understands exactly how to make me look my best. Given the way that scleroderma has changed my face over the years, having a great haircut is much more than an indulgence. It is one of the few ways that I have control over my appearance. I always walk out of the salon feeling wonderful.

The last time I had seen her was 10 weeks ago, more than twice the amount of time that I usually allow to lapse between visits. That trip was courtesy of my younger daughter, who was in town for a visit and drove me in for my appointment, four days after my first surgery. I wasn’t even sure until the night before that I would be able to make it, but was very glad I did.

Now, more than two months later, my hair was flopping, unruly and difficult to manage. Whenever I looked in the mirror, I felt that I looked old and weary. The hand ordeal was taking its toll.

Thank goodness for the HBO therapy. After 10 dives, not only are my grafts healing, but also my energy level has improved significantly, to the point where I felt confident enough to make an appointment. Originally, I had planned to take the train to Boston—time consuming and pricey, but still a good option. Then, when I realized last Sunday that I could actually handle the car on the highway again, I was determined to drive into the city.

Complicating my plan was a cold snap. We’ve been enjoying unseasonably warm weather here in Central Massachusetts, but late fall returned with a vengeance at the end of the week with a freeze overnight and 30°F temperatures, plus stiff winds during the day. I didn’t care. I added extra layers and figured out where to park that would enable me to take a break from the weather on the way to the salon by eating lunch at a favorite restaurant.

My visit did not disappoint. My stylist, who is one of the only women I’ve ever met who looks fantastic with magenta hair, gave me a hug and set to work, skillfully trimming at least an inch, reshaping my graying mop. As she snipped, we caught up on health, family and life in general. When she finished putting the last hair in place, I was grinning. What a relief! I felt like myself again.

The 10 minute walk back to the car was bitter cold, but I was glad that I had driven and not taken the train, which would have required waiting on a very cold platform. The drive home in rush hour on Friday afternoon was long and tedious, and I was happy to walk into our warm house, where Al was preparing Shabbat dinner. I had to lie down for a half-hour, because I was very tired, and my hands were a bit uncomfortable from all the driving in stop-and-go traffic.

But it was well worth it. I no longer feel that I look like a patient. I no longer feel confined.

On Sunday, I drove into Boston again, this time for brunch and a movie date with my eldest daughter. We had a great time together, and when I came home, I still had plenty of energy to sit down at my computer and write this blog post. On Monday afternoon, I will get in my car once again after my HBO therapy and drive into Boston to see my rheumatologist at Boston Medical Center for the first time since my second surgery. The last time I saw him, after my first surgery, Al had to take off from work to bring me. Now, I can do it myself.

Despite all this progress, I know I can’t overdo. Three round trips in four days is plenty for the next week. Driving after the hyperbaric chamber is more tiring than driving on the weekend when I’m rested. Still . . . it feels really, really good.

Evelyn Herwitz blogs weekly about living fully with chronic disease, the inside of baseballs, turtles and frogs, J.S. Bach, the meaning of life and whatever else she happens to be thinking about at livingwithscleroderma.com.

Image Credit: Alex Iby

6 Down, 24 to Go

I finished my sixth hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) dive on Monday. Already, it’s becoming routine. But getting to that point took all of last week. Here are some lessons learned, so far:

  • It’s really important to have some meaningful entertainment when you are confined to your back, lying inside a glass-and-steel chamber for 2 hours and 20 minutes. I decided to immerse in the best fiction writing I could find at the library. Toni Morrison’s A Mercy, narrated by the author, proved to be the perfect choice. Her language is magnificent, and her artistry is both an inspiration and a thought-provoking guide to revising the first draft of my novel (finished in late winter, incubating since then due to all the hand mishegas).
  • Definitely go with a light breakfast for an early morning dive. I do not want to have to take a bathroom break in the midst of the dive—that would either truncate the day’s session or require a second dive/reverse of pressure. Too anxiety-provoking.
  • Meditation breathing really helps to counter claustrophobia. During my third dive last week, I suddenly began to feel trapped in the chamber. Focusing on my breath enabled me to calm myself and focus on the audio novel.
  • Bring a granola bar or other healthy snack for after the dive. I have yet to do this, but I realize it would be a good idea. I’m very hungry when finished, and I still have to spend nearly two hours redoing all my dressings. The dive increases your metabolism rate.
  • Ear tubes—which I had inserted on Friday—definitely ease the pressure on eustachian tubes during the dive (in the first 15 minutes or so, pressure in the chamber increases to 2 atmospheres, the equivalent of being 35 feet below sea level). However, the tubes have also caused some additional muffling of my hearing, to my dismay. My right ear cleared a bit over the weekend, so I no longer sound to myself as if I’m talking under water. But my left has yet to clear, and I can hear my pulse in my left ear.
  • Sometimes I am very energized when I come home, and other days, I need a nap. No clear rhyme or reason. But I have been able to put in a productive afternoon of work every day, so far.
  • The therapy works.
    • Exhibit A: I have had an intractable ulcer on my left inside ankle for almost a year, which had mostly healed over the summer, but was persistently flaking and threatening to reopen. After two days of HBO, the skin was completely healed. Miraculous.
    • Exhibit B: The donor site for my skin grafts on my right thigh shrank by about 50 percent last week. I was finally able to flake off the very dry scab Sunday, which had become quite itchy.
    • Exhibit C: My finger pain has decreased even more than it had from just the grafts. I am now able to drive again. The vibrations of the steering wheel no longer hurt my fingers. I put this to the test on Sunday and was able to drive us to a wedding over an hour away, and back. First long-distance highway drive since July.
    • Exhibit D: My health care team unanimously thinks my grafts are healing well. I spiked an infection in my right middle finger, so am back on antibiotics. But it appears to be healing again, thank goodness.

Tuesday morning is Dive Number 7. I plan to vote in our local elections on my way home. I’m grateful that I feel up to it. Whatever your health circumstances, I hope you do, too.

Evelyn Herwitz blogs weekly about living fully with chronic disease, the inside of baseballs, turtles and frogs, J.S. Bach, the meaning of life and whatever else she happens to be thinking about at livingwithscleroderma.com.

Image Credit: The HBO chamber I’m using looks a lot like this image from Long Beach Medical Center in Long Beach, California.

So Far, So Good

A week has passed since my second hand surgery, and I’m pleased to report that I am bouncing back more quickly than I expected. Skin grafts are healing well, and my appeal was approved for hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

It’s been quite the ride. For the first few days, my hands were protected by huge padded splints that went halfway down my forearms. My pain level was quite manageable, thank goodness, but I could not do a thing for myself.

You really don’t realize how much you depend on your hands until you can’t use them at all. I felt like a baby. Al did yeoman duty, feeding me, wiping me and washing me, all with patience and good humor. He is a good man. We were both blessed and energized by caring friends who brought delicious home-cooked meals all week, and by many prayers for healing and kind wishes.

Everything changed on Thursday, when Dr. S removed the splints. He checked the graft on my left middle finger (he deemed it good) and the flap of skin that is now sealing my right middle finger (also deemed good). The other two grafts he left alone for inspection on Monday. But I had my hands back.

As soon as I came home from my appointment on Thursday, I was able to sit at my computer and get some work done. Even as I was tired, it was a tremendous relief to be able to use my hands again, with care, and regain some independence. I’m not ready to drive, yet, but I hope to as soon as I feel confident that my grafts have stabilized.

When Dr. S checked the grafts on Monday, he was more than pleased. The skin was nice and pink, a major accomplishment, given my poor circulation. I’ve been keeping my hands warm using heat packs on my wrists. Since I can’t put on my wrist warmers right now (bulky bandages), I have been wrapping the heat pacs into ace bandages around each wrist. Works just fine.

I still have two pins in my left index and right pinky. These will come out soon. Monday afternoon, I had smaller splints made to stabilize the three grafted fingers as they heal. I’m still figuring out how best to care for the “donor site” on my right thigh, a two-by-four-inch rectangle where a thin layer of skin was removed for the grafts, but it appears to be healing slowly.

Also on Monday, I got the green light on my hyperbaric oxygen therapy appeal. This was especially surprising, because our health insurance had called the end of last week, claiming that we had never applied for prior authorization, so no appeal was appropriate. I referred them to our hospital wound center contact who had, indeed, filed the request that had, indeed, been declined. I also explained that the HBO would probably save them money because it would spare me more surgeries, if it works. That argument may have done the trick, because they never even bothered with a peer-to-peer review. In any case, I start next week.

It’s a lot to absorb. I’m extremely grateful that my wounds, now covered with my own skin, are less painful, and that the risk of having skin grafts has been, so far, worth taking. One step at a time. . . .

Evelyn Herwitz blogs weekly about living fully with chronic disease, the inside of baseballs, turtles and frogs, J.S. Bach, the meaning of life and whatever else she happens to be thinking about at livingwithscleroderma.com.

Next Steps

It’s been muggy and drizzly and rainy as Nate sweeps through New England this Columbus Day. Not much left to the storm, fortunately for us. And good weather lies ahead for the next few days. I spent the afternoon getting as much work done as I could, because I’m facing more hand surgery a week from today.

I wasn’t expecting this to happen so soon. Indeed, I have been savoring regained abilities. My big accomplishment last week was running an errand after a doctor’s appointment, something I haven’t been able to do since before my first surgery at the end of August. I even went for a massage, a most welcomed treat.

But my hand surgeon, Dr. S, told me we need to move ahead with the skin grafts on four of my fingers, the ones with the largest open wounds post-debridement, because there is a limit on how long the two stabilizing pins in my right pinky and left index finger can remain. My Boston Medical Center rheumatologist agrees that the grafts are worth trying. Dr. S says he will know if the grafts take when he looks at my fingers three days after the surgery. If the grafts don’t work, he wants to give the skin more time to heal on its own before going to amputations. That is, of course, the last resort.

So I went ahead and sent in the insurance appeal for the hyperbaric oxygen treatment last Friday. Asking for a peer-to-peer review. We shall see.

I also decided not to go with Botox shots in my hands, despite Dr. S’s recommendation. The research just doesn’t give me enough confidence in the procedure. In particular, I found a study published this summer in Arthritis & Rheumatology—randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, funded in part by the Scleroderma Research Foundation—of scleroderma patients who had undergone Botox injections in one hand and saline in the other as a control. One month out from the treatment, the researchers found a statistically significant decrease in blood circulation in the Botox-injected hands—the exact opposite of the intended outcome. In addition, other research I found indicated that about a third of Raynaud’s patients who undergo Botox injections in their hands experience paralysis that lasts from two to four months. No thank you.

Instead, I’m going to boost my hand circulation with a low tech solution: hand warmer packets inserted into my wrist warmers.

I don’t relish going under the knife again. But it’s also better to just get it out of the way while the weather is still relatively warm. I’ve switched my daily guided meditation (highly recommend Headspace) from pain management to stress management. I’m looking forward to a movie date with Mindi the day before surgery.

I will be taking a break from blogging next week, given timing of the surgery, and will report in when I’m up for sitting at the computer again. Until then, I wish all of us peace and healing.

Evelyn Herwitz blogs weekly about living fully with chronic disease, the inside of baseballs, turtles and frogs, J.S. Bach, the meaning of life and whatever else she happens to be thinking about at livingwithscleroderma.com.

Image Credit: Isaac Benhesed