Thoughts and Prayers

I woke up Monday morning to read the tragic, depressing news about the mass shooting in Las Vegas on Sunday night. And to read the inevitable comments on social media, news analyses, and verbal throwing of hands in the air, how will we ever stop this scourge? Lots of tweets and Facebook posts about sending thoughts and prayers to those affected by the tragedy, as well as criticisms of “thoughts and prayers” as being enough already. Time for action to end what has become a major public health crisis in this country.

I felt myself sinking into the morass. There must be a way for us to come together as a country and solve this. I wish I had the answer. I don’t. But I want to put in a word for the value of thoughts and prayers.

Thoughts and prayers are not a passive pursuit. Indeed, thinking — as in imagining what it is like to have been the victim of a tragedy — is one of the most important first steps any of us can take to get past the divisive rhetoric surrounding this issue and move toward finding common ground. Empathy is an essential virtue.

Prayer is a meditative way to direct those thoughts toward healing, dialogue, problem-solving. It is a means to focus energy toward the greater good. It is also a means to short-circuit knee-jerk reactions, accusations, epithets —  everything that distracts from the hard work of reaching consensus.

I have been the beneficiary of many thoughts and prayers from family and friends over these past few months as I have been wrestling with my hand issues. I genuinely believe that all that positive energy has helped me to find strength. Many caring messages have brightened my days.

So I don’t believe that thoughts and prayers are waste of time, on either a personal or communal level. Thoughts and prayers alone, however, are not enough. Not to solve a problem as big as the one our nation is facing.

Here is a link to one of the best articles I have seen that explains why our country is so mired in the debate over guns, even as we actually agree on more than headlines and raging pundits would allow. I hope it gives you some clarity as you wrestle with this issue in your own way:

 Gun Violence in America, Explained in 17 Maps and Charts, Vox 10-2-17

Evelyn Herwitz blogs weekly about living fully with chronic disease, the inside of baseballs, turtles and frogs, J.S. Bach, the meaning of life and whatever else she happens to be thinking about at livingwithscleroderma.com.

Image Credit: David Monje

Comments

  1. Jesse Evans says:

    Evie thanks so much for your post, and for including the article. I plan to use the data when talking with friends who support NRA positions. It on social media of course, but in person. (Like my brother for example)!
    Jesse

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