Nuts and Bolts

Picking up small objects—especially when they’ve dropped on the floor—has been a challenge for decades. Keys and coins are particularly difficult. Because my finger tips have resorbed and I don’t have much in the way of nails, it’s really tricky to grasp narrow edges and flip the object into my palm. This has prompted some creative problem solving over the years, such as using a piece of scrap paper to slip under the offending item, or pressing on its edge with my toe to leverage the other side.

It’s become all the more challenging since my hand surgery. I’m now missing several finger tips altogether, which makes it that much harder to grasp little stuff.

Or so I thought, until I underwent a fascinating OT assessment last Thursday. I had scheduled this appointment to help determine how much sensitivity is left in my hands. I met with one of my hand surgeon’s occupational therapists, accompanied by two students, who politely asked if I minded their participation in the assessment. I’m always glad to teach, and I certainly provide a rare case study, so I welcomed their involvement.

And here’s what I had to do: I sat across from one of the students, who served as time keeper and recorder. She emptied a box of small objects on the table—a wing nut, a large and small hexagonal nut, a small square nut, a washer, a key, three coins (penny, nickel and dime), two sizes of safety pins, and a large and small paperclip. My task, using first my right hand alone and then my left, was to pick up each object and place it in the box. If I couldn’t do it, I would slide the object off the table into my other hand, but this reduced my score. The test was timed.

This was tricky. I completed both tests in under two minutes, but I couldn’t pick up everything with my left hand. Still, all were impressed by my dexterity. I was surprised, too.

The next step was to repeat the test on each hand—with my eyes closed. To my amazement, I actually did better on this round with my left hand, picking up every object, and doing it faster than when I had my eyes open! Clearly, the fact that I know I’m right handed and assumed that I couldn’t do as much with my left hand affected my approach to the puzzle when I was able to see. Very interesting proof of how expectations can affect what we think we can accomplish.

The final test involved closing my eyes and having the student place each object in my palm (right hand first, then left). I had to identify the object and place it in the box. By now I knew what each item felt like, but manipulating without being able to grasp it involved some juggling, and sensing contours was not so easy without my fingertips, which I can’t bend enough to form anything close to a fist. Nonetheless, I got all the answers right with each hand.

The team was very enthusiastic. I certainly exceeded their expectations, as well as my own. The conclusion? Despite all the damage to my hands over the years, reduced sensitivity and significantly reduced dexterity due to my recent surgery, I can still sense quite a lot. I may have to approach the process of grasping things with new strategies, but the basic information is still transmitted accurately from my hands to my brain.

Thank goodness.

Evelyn Herwitz blogs weekly about living fully with chronic disease, the inside of baseballs, turtles and frogs, J.S. Bach, the meaning of life and whatever else she happens to be thinking about at livingwithscleroderma.com.

Image Credit: Konstantin Olsen

How’re Y’all Doin’?

Punxsutawney Phil may have seen his shadow last week, predicting six more weeks of winter (of course, technically, there are always about six more weeks of winter after Ground Hog Day). But Al and I took a break from freezing cold at home and headed south Wednesday night, landing in New Orleans for a long weekend. On Thursday, we were walking around without coats. Even when the weather dipped into the mid-50s, it was still welcome, compared to Massachusetts.

I’d been imagining this trip for several years as I worked on the first draft of my novel. Now that I’m starting revisions, I need to know more about my protagonist, who immigrates from France to New Orleans as a child in the 1870s. So the plan was to mix research and fun, to escape winter’s frigid clutches and celebrate my healed hands. And celebrate, we did.

NOLA is known for its incredible cuisine and did not disappoint. The jazz was great, the art provocative, the neighborhoods intriguing. Most people we met were welcoming and went out of their way to be helpful. Strangers looked us in the eyes and greeted us with a friendly “How’re y’all doin’?” as they passed us by. We caught Mardi Gras beads flung from parade floats (celebrations fill the month leading up to Fat Tuesday), noodled around stores and art galleries, walked and walked and walked. Our Lyft drivers told us about life in their home town and their experiences during and recovering from Katrina. On Sunday morning before we left, we strolled along the banks of the mighty Mississippi in Crescent Park and watched a sky blue freighter steam slowly past.

My research included an immersion in selected materials at the Historic New Orleans Collection, a walk through the Hebrew Rest Cemetery, a look at the city’s oldest hospital, rambles through the Garden District and Faubourg Marigny neighborhood to photograph the many and varied styles of housing. I thought about light and heat and immigrants and masks.

Saturday evening, we discovered a vintage costume shop, filled with bling. As Al shopped for the loudest tie he could find for Purim (a Jewish holiday with its own carnival vibe), I scanned the racks and discovered a beautiful beaded overblouse. I tried it on. Lovely. But when would I ever wear it? I left it on the rack, and we went to dinner across the street.

Good as the meal was—outstanding Middle Eastern food—I wondered. Why not? If the store was still open when we finished, I said to Al, I’d like to go back. As we walked up to the door, the owner and her clerks were about to lock up. But she welcomed me inside. “You need to make your own festivities,” she said as she wrapped the overblouse in white tissue paper and placed it in a purple plastic bag.

Even with the freezing temperatures here, I’m glad to be home. We packed a week’s worth of touring into three-and-a-half days, I was fighting a cold, and I’m tired. But it was well worth every minute. My hands held up. No infections. Many sights and ideas to mull. Make your own festivities, indeed.

Evelyn Herwitz blogs weekly about living fully with chronic disease, the inside of baseballs, turtles and frogs, J.S. Bach, the meaning of life and whatever else she happens to be thinking about at livingwithscleroderma.com.

Arts and Flowers

We’re having a brief respite from the cold before bitter weather arrives once again. So what better time to get a mental and spiritual break from winter than this past weekend at the Worcester Art Museum’s annual Flora in Winter exhibit. Local florists and garden club mavens create beautiful floral interpretations of art in nearly every gallery. Here are ten of my favorites. Enjoy!

Evelyn Herwitz blogs weekly about living fully with chronic disease, the inside of baseballs, turtles and frogs, J.S. Bach, the meaning of life and whatever else she happens to be thinking about at livingwithscleroderma.com.

Special Treat

I am getting really tired of winter. I know, it’s only a month into the season, officially. We’ve had one real storm and another day of snowfall; not so bad, so far. But it’s the extreme cold of recent weeks and the fluctuating temperatures that I’m finding exhausting. At least the days are getting noticeably longer, once again—a saving grace.

So it was this weekend that I decided to beat the winter blahs and treat myself to some new clothes. I have been wearing the same sweatpants, turtle necks and long sweaters, in varying combinations, for months, now. And I have not gone clothes shopping in a very long time—not since my hands began to deteriorate last spring. The idea of trying on outfits was anathema. I couldn’t manage it. Now that my hands have healed, a shopping spree was a real option.

It didn’t hurt that end-of-season sales were in full swing (ironic, since the season is far from over!). I gave myself a full afternoon, so I wouldn’t feel rushed, to check out some stores at a nearby mall. This, in itself, was a change of tempo, since I’ve come to rely on the Internet for the majority of my purchases.

I picked a good time, because the mall was not crowded. The stores I chose had only a few customers; sales staff were pleasant and helpful. And I scored big: a pretty and practical wardrobe for transitional temperatures, with coordinated layers that I can mix and match. All soft, comfy and relatively easy to put on and take off. And all within the modest budget I’d set for myself.

Most amazing, I actually had fun shopping! This has not been the case for a long time. Dressing, undressing and dressing again has been a huge hurdle. I haven’t been happy with how clothes fit. But I’d done enough homework to pick the right stores with options that fit my taste and pocketbook. In two hours, I was done, buoyed by success.

In addition, I realized that my vision, which has been blurred for weeks due to the hyperbaric oxygen therapy, is beginning to clear. When I had ventured to a mall several weeks ago for a small errand, the signs were so blurred that I felt dizzy. As I left the mall on Sunday, it suddenly occurred to me that I hadn’t noticed or felt disoriented by my inability to see objects that were farther away. So, more progress.

Snow on the ground will be gone by Tuesday evening, thanks to a day of heavy rainfall (fortunately we’re in a short warming pattern, or we’d be buried again). At some point, the crocuses will peak out of our garden. And I continue, thank goodness, to heal.

Evelyn Herwitz blogs weekly about living fully with chronic disease, the inside of baseballs, turtles and frogs, J.S. Bach, the meaning of life and whatever else she happens to be thinking about at livingwithscleroderma.com.

Sideways

I had my first visit with my new occupational therapist last week and learned a few things. I learned that it takes about 18 months for your nerves to rewire after the kind of surgery I’ve undergone on my hands—but that most of the change happens in the first 6 months. I learned that my skin grafts will never have full sensation, although I can sense more than I realized. And I learned that I’m not imagining how the skin flap on my middle right finger is sending confusing signals to my brain about what I’m actually feeling and how my finger is oriented. More on that in a minute.

My OT works in my hand surgeon’s office, so she has a ton of expertise when it comes to my specifics. This is a great blessing. She explained that even if some of my nerves don’t regenerate, others may learn to compensate. To get a baseline assessment, she had me lay my hands outspread (as much as I can) on the table, palm down and then up. I had to close my eyes while she tapped different spots on my fingers with a series of plastic filaments, from a hair’s breadth in width to the thickness of a pencil lead. When I felt something, I let her know.

This took a while, but what we discovered is that my ability to sense touch is better than either of us expected (a good thing) and that my grafts have both deep pressure sensation and the ability to detect heat and sharpness (a very good thing). So, at least, I should be able to avoid burns and serious cuts. It’s not a free pass, but reassuring.

My right middle finger, in turn, has good sensation except for the flap’s seam. Basically, skin on the right side of that finger is now folded over the top and connected to the left side, with the top third amputated. It looks odd and stumpy, but it works well enough. What’s curious is how I think I’m still touching objects with the side of my finger when I’m actually feeling with what is now the rounded tip.

My OT explained that the nerves in what used to be the side of that finger are specialized, and my brain is still registering sensation as if my finger is moving sideways. Combine this with the fact that the finger is now a third shorter than it used to be, and it’s no wonder I can’t quite figure out where it is relative to objects I’m touching. Fortunately, she said, this will resolve with time as my brain rewires. Fascinating.

More sessions to come over the next few weeks as I learn how to use my hands again. My homework is to practice curling what’s left of my topmost knuckles before I bend my lower knuckles to approximate a fist. That way I achieve more of a grip. I’ve discovered that it helps to practice this while holding the steering wheel of my Prius, which is thick and padded and just about the right curvature.

Mostly, however, I need to be more mindful of how I reach and manipulate objects. I suppose this will become second nature with time. But it doesn’t hurt to bring a sense of purposeful awareness into simple movements. A good lesson there, too.

Evelyn Herwitz blogs weekly about living fully with chronic disease, the inside of baseballs, turtles and frogs, J.S. Bach, the meaning of life and whatever else she happens to be thinking about at livingwithscleroderma.com.

Image Credit: Hunter Harritt

How Not to Spend a Snowstorm

We are emerging from a deep freeze. Over the weekend, temperatures here in Central Massachusetts dipped to 1°F—in the daytime. By comparison, teens and twenties seem, if not balmy, at least bearable.

This was on top of a Nor’easter that dumped 17 inches of snow on our fair city, an all-day event last Thursday that I was grateful to avoid while hunkered down at home. But contrary to how I would have preferred to spend a snowstorm—enjoying comfort food while watching the snow blow at a 45 degree angle outside—I had the distinct displeasure of having to do a day-long liquid fast, in preparation for my 10-year-plus colonoscopy screening the following morning.

I had been postponing this distasteful exam for at least six months. The original was scheduled for the summer, but as my hands deteriorated, I decided to spare myself additional discomfort and put it off to the fall. Then, when I began the HBO therapy, I had another excuse to put it off until January.

When the storm predictions looked more and more threatening, I was hoping the weather might force another extension. What if it dragged on until Friday? What if our road wasn’t plowed? No such luck. The snow began to taper off around 5:00 p.m., just as I was starting the noxious lemon flavored drink to purge my gut.

According to the instructions, you’re supposed to drink two liters of the vile stuff the evening prior and the remaining two liters the next morning, with three hours to spare before the procedure. Now, I don’t normally drink that much fluid in a day, let alone in a matter of hours, let alone something that sickly sweet with such an intentionally unpleasant outcome.

But, drink, I did. Fortunately, I had a good book to read as a distraction—The Accursed, by Joyce Carole Oates—which, I realized later, was an appropriate title for how I was feeling in the moment.

I woke up around 4:00 a.m., gave up on sleep because my hands were bothering me (since I couldn’t take Ibuprofen with food), changed my dressings and set to work on the remaining two liters. I got through about half of it when I decided I was done. There was nothing left to come out, and I couldn’t stand any more.

As it turned out, that was the right call, because when the admitting nurse Friday morning asked how much I’d drank, and I told her three of the four liters, she simply wrote it down and said “fine.”

The outpatient center where I had my procedure does nothing but endoscopies of one sort or another. I asked how many colonoscopies they do in a day, and the nurse said about 50. Wow. All the other patients there looked about as wiped out as I felt, waiting to get it over with. I signed a bunch of forms, including one fascinating list that included alternative screening tests, such as X-rays. Did anyone give me the information in advance that this was an option? No. Did I even think to ask? No. It may not be as thorough a screening, but I would have at least liked to have had the discussion with my primary.

Then there was the question of IVs. I knew they would give me a sedative for the procedure, which was fine by me. But after the nurse inserted the hep-lock in my arm and flushed it with saline, she simply said they would give me “some medicine” during the procedure. I was not about to leave it at that. “What kind?” I asked. Only then did she give me specifics, which were also listed on another form I then had to sign, though I seriously wonder if they expected me to read it before signing (which I did). Fortunately, I had experience with both meds. Even as she’d reviewed my numerous allergies in advance, I would have preferred specifics up front.

Into the procedure room I was wheeled. The team was friendly and professional. I chatted with the doctor’s assistant about our respective experiences driving in snow storms. I learned that they had actually stayed open the morning of the storm for those brave enough to go through with their tests, despite the snow.

Soon I was half-asleep, conscious of something going on “down there,” but more in a state of wonderment. As I dozed in recovery, I made note of all the beeping and dinging machines nearby. Apple juice and graham crackers never tasted so good. Best of all was the immediate report from the doctor that I passed with flying colors. No signs, either, of sclerosis in my colon, thank goodness.

It was a relief to see Al in the waiting room, ready to take me home. I made myself a nice, late breakfast of scrambled eggs and toast, then lay down for a nap. The next extremely cold day, I was very glad to stay home.

Ten more years until I have to do this again. I hope, by then, some brilliant person will have devised an easier, comfortable, quicker way to do this exam. Maybe we’ll just be able to scan our own colons and transmit a hologram for inspection. Wouldn’t that be nice.

Evelyn Herwitz blogs weekly about living fully with chronic disease, the inside of baseballs, turtles and frogs, J.S. Bach, the meaning of life and whatever else she happens to be thinking about at livingwithscleroderma.com.

New Year, New Hands

Last Thursday, I finished my 40th dive in the hyperbaric oxygen chamber. My grafts have healed. The Wound Center staff gave me a “certificate of completion” decorated with pictures—a fountain pen and typewritten words, a graphic for all the podcasts I listened to while bandaging up my fingers after my dives, an image of a Fig Newton, my favorite post-dive snack. Everyone signed with good wishes. I promised to come back and visit.

It seems amazing to be through. I still have bandages on my thumbs—the right as it continues to heal and the left, to protect a chronic pit that waxes and wanes. I’m moisturizing the grafts during the day, leaving them exposed to the air so the skin toughens up but remains pliable. I’m learning to interpret the sensations from the flap on my right middle finger. And I’m touch-typing away, thank goodness.

Christmas weekend, I took my daughters to see my sister and her family in the Midwest, my first trip since Al and I traveled to Norway in August. A good visit, anticipated for months, certainly not as strenuous a journey as this summer, but a bit of a psychological hurdle, given how my hands fell apart when we were abroad. I took extra care to protect my fingers, which paid off. No new ulcers, no damage. Just a rotten head cold on the way home, which mostly cleared by the end of the week.

So, here I am, starting 2018 with “revised” hands, all ten fingers. There is adjusting to do. I need to relearn what I can and cannot tackle, given that left index and right pinky are fused at the joint, right middle is stubby like a cigar, and left middle no longer bends at the partially amputated, grafted tip. The grafts have no nerve sensitivity, which requires mindful awareness of what I place where. Most of my fingers no longer move the way they used to. I’ve made an appointment for Thursday to see an occupational therapist in my hand surgeon’s office, to get some exercises to strengthen my grip, increase flexibility and discuss what I need to adapt.

Still, I’m feeling upbeat. I can do for myself again. Even temperatures here in the deep freeze for another week are only a temporary annoyance. Tucking hot packs into my wrist warmers staves off numbness. Staying cozy beneath the covers for an extra hour in the morning, now that I don’t need to push to get to the hospital, helps, too.

I could never have imagined, on New Year’s last, that I would be celebrating having all my fingers today. It’s just as well that we can’t see into the future. Too terrifying. If 2017 has taught me anything, it’s been how to stay very focused on the present, to measure progress in small steps, to be grateful for little victories that add up with persistence, to not let my fears keep me from taking reasonable risks for my health.

So, here’s to 2018. Bring it on. Just let me keep my fingers, please.

Evelyn Herwitz blogs weekly about living fully with chronic disease, the inside of baseballs, turtles and frogs, J.S. Bach, the meaning of life and whatever else she happens to be thinking about at livingwithscleroderma.com.

Miraculous

As of today, I have five dives left. My progress has been striking. I am touch-typing this post with five fingers between my two hands. Grafts on my right pinky and left middle finger have fully healed, as has the flap on my right middle finger. My left index graft is close to healed, though it’s taking longer because of a probable infection that is now under control. My right thumb is closing up, even as a second ulcer with calcium deposits opened in the tip last week.

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy notwithstanding, calcinosis remains one of my biggest challenges. My fingers are loaded with the little gray pits, and one is rising to the surface of my right index finger at just the wrong pressure point. But there is no cure for this, only patience and constant tending. Meanwhile, the worst of this marathon is behind me, thank goodness.

A friend asked me what I would do with all the time freed up in the morning, after the HBO ends next Thursday. Well, for one thing, I hope to get a little more sleep! It will be a pleasure not to have to head out to the hospital on a cold wintry morning at 7 o’clock. My goal is to use the regained three hours for my fiction writing. I’ve had to put this aside for the duration—filling the gap by listening to fine fiction via audio books while lying in the HBO chamber. Good to get back to my own creative writing, especially now that I can type again.

It will take some time to fully adjust to my “revised” hands. I’m still figuring out how much pressure I can exert on the two fingers that now have fused bones where knuckles used to be. I have next to no feeling in the grafts, so I have to learn how to interpret sensations deeper in these fingers—and avoid damaging what I don’t immediately notice.

The finger with the flap presents its own unique challenge: since the skin that was once the side of the finger is now wrapped over the top of the amputated tip, the nerves send confusing signals to my brain. The finger is also notably shorter and stubbier, which requires some readjustment to reach. I’m not quite sure what/where I’m feeling. So, practice, practice, practice, and my brain, I trust, will rewire.

But I remain amazed to have come through this eight month ordeal with functioning hands and ten fingers. This evening is the eighth night of Hanukkah. For me and my family, it is a most fitting way to mark my miraculous recovery.

I will be traveling over the weekend and taking a break next week from blogging. To you, Dear Reader, best wishes for a wonderful holiday season filled with joy, love, health and healing.

Evelyn Herwitz blogs weekly about living fully with chronic disease, the inside of baseballs, turtles and frogs, J.S. Bach, the meaning of life and whatever else she happens to be thinking about at livingwithscleroderma.com.

Image Credit: Element5 Digital

33

We had our first snow of the season on Saturday—a fluffy powder that transformed trees to Battenberg lace. The flakes were too tiny to reveal intricacies as they speckled my brown coat on my walk to and from our synagogue for Shabbat services. By evening, at least four inches covered Al’s car in our drive, and our once-plowed street was white again.

But, no matter. It was our 33rd wedding anniversary, and we would not be deterred from dinner at our favorite restaurant. Snow powdered the night sky as Al carefully drove us along semi-cleared streets. A few other intrepid New Englanders were out and about, as well, and the restaurant was packed when we arrived. We watched the snow blowing beyond the windows as we toasted another year together, a challenging year dominated by my deteriorating hands, but a year that brought us closer.

By the next morning, the sun was high and snow dripped from trees and eaves. We enjoyed a great brunch out, then drove into Boston for a powerful performance of Hold These Truths, a play by Jeanne Sakata, at the Lyric Stage Company. It’s based on the true story of Gordon Hirabayashi, who challenged the internment of fellow Japanese American citizens during World War II. Inspiring and sobering, well worth seeing, especially now.

I was still thinking about the play on Monday as I set out to the hospital at seven o’clock for my HBO therapy. By the time I left, nearly half-past eleven, the temperature was mild, much like that day so long ago when Al and I married.

It was my second marriage, his first. I had sewn my wedding gown, hand stitching nine yards of lace to the tulle veil. The rabbi who introduced us performed the ceremony. We were giddy and full of optimism as we drove to Cape Cod for our honeymoon. One misty night, as we walked Nauset Beach, the sand sparkled with each footstep and the sea froth glowed. It was ghostly, mystical. It gave me chills.

Later, we learned that we had witnessed the natural phenomenon of sea phosphorescence, caused by tiny sea creatures, or, perhaps, some form of sea algae, with their own inner light. But I still think back on that night, when we had no answers and only astonishment, as filled with an eerie, magnificent magic.

About a month later, we learned that I had some form of autoimmune disease. Three years beyond that, I was diagnosed with scleroderma.

I have written before in these posts how a complex, chronic disease becomes the third—unwanted but ultimately accepted—partner in a marriage. Sometimes it fades to the background and can almost be forgotten. Other times, it clears its throat with a rough cough, demanding attention. Then there are times, like this year, when it roars and dominates.

Thirty-three years is a long time to live with an unwelcome guest. Throughout, Al has been by my side, steadfast, the one who hears and sees the worst of it and always reminds me that as long as we have each other, we’ll be okay. The excitement I felt on our wedding day may have all too soon been supplanted by the fear and anguish of a terrifying diagnosis. But love and trust, tended over decades, have proven much stronger than any disease.

Outside our window on Monday night, the streetlamp casts a stark, inky shadow on the snow from the sign Al placed on our front yard a few weeks ago: “Hate Has No Home Here.” He has given more signs to our neighbors, who were pleased to accept them. A few have placed the signs already; he hopes to create a little oasis of radiance on our street. Wednesday evening, at his initiative, we will help serve meals at a homeless shelter nearby.

This is the man who left a trail of sparkles in the sand on a misty night, as a ghostly surf pounded the shore. I had no idea, then, how truly lucky I was.

Evelyn Herwitz blogs weekly about living fully with chronic disease, the inside of baseballs, turtles and frogs, J.S. Bach, the meaning of life and whatever else she happens to be thinking about at livingwithscleroderma.com.

Image Credit: Luke Hodde

Tradeoffs

After two dozen dives, my hands continue to heal, thank goodness. I’m typing this post with a few fingers on each hand, instead of poking away with a stylus.

But I am also beginning to experience one of the side-effects of HBO therapy—blurred vision. For more than a week, I’ve noticed that road signs look a bit fuzzy when I’ve driven home from the hospital. Then, last week, I realized that my computer glasses no longer were the right correction. Instead, I needed to wear my regular bifocals and sit a bit farther back from the screen.

Over the weekend, to my dismay, things got more blurred. I can certainly see, but when we went to the movies Saturday night, the screen was a bit fuzzy. I did some long distance driving on Sunday to be sure I could still handle it, and I could—but needed Al’s help to read signs.

Fortunately, I still have my most recent pair of glasses, which have a stronger correction for nearsightedness. As I’ve discovered over the past few annual check-ups at the optometrist, aging can improve vision of distant objects. So using my old prescription has compensated for the worst of the problem—for the time being.

I’m told it could continue to get worse, in which case I’ll need to get a new prescription and a pair of cheap glasses to tide me over until I finish my dives. Based on my discussion with the team last Thursday, we’ve agreed to apply for insurance coverage for 10 more sessions, to be sure my grafts heal fully. That will take me into the last week of December.

The vision issues, like my hearing issues that have required temporary ear tubes, should resolve within six to eight weeks after I finish diving. I’m hoping it doesn’t get worse. But it could.

Even still, I’d rather stick with the treatment. Too much is at stake for healing my hands, especially as the weather gets colder. If I have to get driving glasses for a few months, so be it. Fortunately, I had a previously scheduled eye dilation appointment with my optometrist last week, and everything else is fine. As for my farsighted correction, I’m better off with my current prescription. I guess I’ll be switching back and forth.

Miraculous as the HBO therapy has been for me, nothing is ever that easy.

Evelyn Herwitz blogs weekly about living fully with chronic disease, the inside of baseballs, turtles and frogs, J.S. Bach, the meaning of life and whatever else she happens to be thinking about at livingwithscleroderma.com.

Image Credit: Clem Onojeghuo