To Appeal or Not to Appeal

I’m pleased to report, three weeks post hand surgery, that I’m making small progress every day. I’m able to sit at my computer for most of the afternoon, and it’s been great to catch up with my clients and focus on projects instead of my hands. I drove short distances twice last week — to two separate medical appointments. My hands were tired afterward, but it was wonderful to feel that I had some independence again. This Tuesday afternoon, Dr. S removes the sutures in two of my fingers, which have been driving me crazy. Hoping this will help to relieve some of the chronic pain that I’ve been experiencing.

However, last Thursday I found out that I was declined for the hyperbaric oxygen therapy, otherwise known as HBO. It wasn’t a big surprise, because the criteria for insurance coverage are very narrow and specific, unless you have a diagnosis of diabetes. Which I do not.

I’m not sure what to make of this. The chance of improving the odds for healing pre- and post-skin grafts — the next step in my surgery — is certainly very appealing. At the same time, the huge time commitment that this therapy requires is daunting. As I mentioned in a previous post, it involves spending three hours a day, five days a week for six weeks, lying in a large chamber with a clear cover, during which time you are exposed to 100 percent oxygen to boost healing.

Although I am not claustrophobic most of the time, I have my moments. I’m only 5’2″ tall (actually a little less than that now, as I’ve started shrinking), and being amidst a large crowd can really spook me, because I can’t see over people’s heads. I’ve also had some uncomfortable experiences when I’ve had MRIs. One time, I had to press the panic button because I was starting to feel lightheaded by being so confined.

I have no idea if appealing the insurance company’s decision will make a bit of difference. Highly doubtful.

And yet . . . I don’t like the idea of giving up without a fight. I found a current research study in the International Journal of Dermatology that had very encouraging results for healing scleroderma ulcers using HBO. The only problem, as with so much scleroderma research, is that the sample size is so small — only six subjects. But every one of the subjects experienced improvement. So I sent the study along to the Wound Center, which has been handling the insurance inquiry, and I need to follow up with them.

Meanwhile, it’s time to prepare for Rosh Hashanah, which begins Wednesday evening. Al is my sous chef, with help from Emily, as well, come Wednesday. We look forward to gathering with family and friends for a festive meal to welcome in the Jewish New Year. This past year has brought some of the greatest health challenges that I have ever faced. Whether you celebrate or not, whatever your tradition and faith, may all in need of healing be blessed with improved health — physical, mental and spiritual.

Evelyn Herwitz blogs weekly about living fully with chronic disease, the inside of baseballs, turtles and frogs, J.S. Bach, the meaning of life and whatever else she happens to be thinking about at livingwithscleroderma.com.

Image: The Lærdalstunnelen, 24.5 km, world’s longest road tunnel, from our Norway trip. There are beautiful blue lights at three intervals to break up the monotony, and, I suspect, to ease claustrophobic fears.

Comments

  1. Paticia Bizzell says:

    Loved the metaphorical resonance of the tunnel photo, and I guess a literal connection too in re. nervousness in the HBC. Sorry to hear you were declined for that therapy–at least initially. You are a fighter!

    Meanwhile I hope the suture removal today goes smoothly and grants you some relief. May you have a blessed and healthier new year.

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